The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan

 

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 Oct 23, 1857 - The Palliser Expedition reached Fort Carlton, which they used as a base for the winter before pushing on to the Rocky Mountains the following year.

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  • Esterhazy, Paul (1831–1912) 94% Esterhazy, Paul (1831-1912) - Paul Oscar Esterhazy, an immigration agent, was also founder of the Esterhaz Colony, the first Hungarian settlement in Saskatchewan. Esterhazy was born Johannes Packh in Esztergom, Hungary in 1831. By 1868 he was residing in New York City under the name of Paul Oscar Esterhazy; his name often appears with the title “Count” before it. ...
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  • Czech and Slovak Settlements 91% Czech and Slovak Settlements - Czech and Slovak settlement in Saskatchewan began in 1884, when four Czech families Pangrac, Junek, Dolezal, and Skokan) from Bohemia settled in the Kolin district near Esterhazy. Bohemian Czechs from the Volhynia region in Ukraine settled around Gerald, just northeast of the town of Esterhazy, in 1898: so the entire region around Esterhazy had small concentrations of Czechs and Slovaks, outnumbered by Hungarians. The National Alliance of Slovaks, Czechs, and ...
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  • Esterhazy 89% Esterhazy - Town, pop 2,348, is located SE of Melville at the junction of Hwys 22 and 80. The town was named for Count Paul Oscar Esterhazy, who settled the first 35 Hungarian families in the area, establishing what came to be known as the Kaposvar Colony. The development of the potash industry in the late 1950s and early 1960s had a dramatic impact on Esterhazy’s progress. International Minerals and Chemicals Corp. (IMC) began construction of the world’s largest potash mine, K1 ...
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  • Hungarian Settlements 85% Hungarian Settlements - Over a quarter of a century, beginning in 1885, Hungarian immigrants developed at least ten named settlements in three regions of Saskatchewan. As Hungarian settlement quickly spread southward toward the Qu’Appelle River , by 1888 the extended colony became known as Kaposvar, after the Hungarian city where the Esterhazy family estates were located. Eventually this Hungarian settlement spread southeastward around Muskiki Lake, where Hungarians mixed with ...
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  • Vanderhaeghe, Guy (1951–) 83% Vanderhaeghe, Guy (1951-) - Guy Clarence Vanderhaeghe was born on April 5, 1951 in Esterhazy, the only child of Clarence Earl and Alma Beth Vanderhaeghe. Man Descending: Selected Stories (1982) made him famous overnight; it won the Governor General’s Award for Fiction and Britain’s Faber Prize. Dancock’s Dance marks Vanderhaeghe’s move into historical subjects. ...
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  • Sisters of Charity of Montreal (Grey Nuns) 83% Sisters of Charity of Montreal (Grey Nuns) - The congregation of the Sisters of Charity of Montreal (the Grey Nuns) was founded by St. Marguerite d'Youville in Montreal in 1737, in response to the needs of the poor in the area. In Saskatchewan, the Grey Nuns are known for their work in health care administration and nursing: St. Joseph's Hospital, Ile-à-la-Crosse (1927-2001); Grey Nuns' Hospital, Regina (1907-74); St. Paul's Hospital, Saskatoon (1907-99); St. Marguerite Hospital, ...
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  • Urban Geography 81% Urban Geography - Saskatchewan’s urban geography is defined by the size, location and function of its urban areas and by their interaction with each other as an urban system. While forty-four of these are now classified as urban settlements, most Saskatchewan towns (96 of 147) are classified as non-urban settlements—all but two of these (94) having populations of less than 1,000, the threshold by which most urban areas are recognized. Population decline is most evident in towns ...
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  • Swedish Settlements 81% Swedish Settlements - The first Swedish settlement in Saskatchewan was the New Stockholm Colony, developed between 1885 and 1887 to the west of Esterhazy in southeastern Saskatchewan. The Swedish Lutheran congregation at Stockholm was the earliest Scandinavian Lutheran Church in Saskatchewan. According to recent census data (2001), 29,900 Saskatchewan residents claim Swedish ethnic origin, of whom 88.6% (26,500) also claim other ethnic origins, compared to just 11.4% (3,400) claiming only ...
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  • Potash Industry 81% Potash Industry - Potash production is a major Saskatchewan industry, which has played a significant role in the economy for over 40 years. Underground potash deposits were laid down by evaporation in an ancient inland sea; three major layers of potash are separated by layers of salt. Production commenced in 1962 when water problems were overcome at the International Minerals and Chemical (IMC) mine near Esterhazy; the Potash Company of America (PCA) then rehabilitated its flooded mine. ...
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  • Milling 81% Milling - Grain milling is the process of grinding and separating wheat and other cereal grains into flour, animal feed, and other products such as rolled, flaked or dehulled grain products. The prairie milling trade was dominated by these two companies until Western Canada Flour Mills and Maple Leaf Mills (both est. In Humboldt, a 100-barrel mill, the McNab Flour Mill, was established in 1913 when A.P. McNab moved a mill from Saskatoon to the town. ...
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  • Utopianism 79% When settlers began to arrive in the 1880s, many colonies were founded which could be considered intentional communities; in some cases the intention was to preserve an ethnic and/or religious identity, such as the German Catholic colony at St. Joseph's near Regina or the Hungarian colony at Esterhazy. A more secular experiment was the Harmony Industrial Association co-operative colony in the Qu'Appelle Valley near Tantallon. In addition there are part-time intentional communities such as ...
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  • Cowessess First Nation 79% Cowessess First Nation - Chief Cowessess (Ka-wezauce, "Little Boy") adhered to Treaty 4 on September 15, 1874, on the Hudson's Bay Company reserve, at the southeastern end of Echo Lake, with his Saulteaux , Cree , and Métis followers. Education was always a priority: the first log school house was built in 1880 by the Oblate fathers; Cowessess Indian Residential School opened in 1898; and Lakeside Day School was built in 1934. The 21,488-ha Cowessess Reserve is 13 km northwest of ...
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  • Centre for Community Studies 79% Centre for Community Studies - The Centre for Community Studies was established at the University of Saskatchewan in 1957 following a recommendation of the Saskatchewan Royal Commission on Agriculture and Rural Life. Each community established a "Community Development Council" made up of representatives of community organizations. The Centre's Training Division focused on leadership roles including helping professional and community leaders to work more effectively on the development of ...
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  • Bredenbury 79% Bredenbury - Town, pop 354, located roughly halfway between Yorkton and the Saskatchewan/ Manitoba border on the Yellowhead Hwy (No. The Manitoba and Northwestern Railway (later taken over by the CPR) came through en route to Yorkton in the late 1880s, and by May 1911 Bredenbury had grown large enough to be incorporated as a village; two years later, the community attained town status. Major employers are the CPR in Bredenbury, and the IMC Kalium potash mines near Esterhazy. ...
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  • Saltcoats 77% Saltcoats - Town, pop 494, located 27 km SE of Yorkton on the Yellowhead Hwy, No. With the arrival of the Manitoba and Northwestern Railway in 1888 the name of the community was changed to Saltcoats, after Saltcoats, Scotland, the birthplace of one of the major shareholders in the railway. The Saltcoats post office was also established in 1888 and on April 4, 1894, Saltcoats was incorporated as a village, the first community established as such in what is now Saskatchewan. ...
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  • Roman Catholic Congregations of Women Religious 77% The next group of Sisters came just before World War I . In 1913 the Sisters of Notre Dame came from Auvergne, France to Ponteix, where they ran a boarding school until 1952 and taught in six public schools (1940-76). The Sisters of Sion also ran boarding schools in Moose Jaw (1914-91) and Saskatoon (1919-66), operated a women's residence in Saskatoon (1917-76), and taught in several elementary schools in both cities. Other teaching orders and their major schools included the Sisters of Our ...
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  • Public Art 77% Public Art - Before Saskatchewan was constituted, First Nations people and settlers had already claimed the land with artworks they placed in shared spaces. In 1992, Saskatoon-based artist Taras Polataiko presented a bracing critique of the tradition of public art in Saskatchewan. Yet it still generates crucial questions: about the relationship public art cultivates with sponsors, viewers, and the spaces it inhabits; and about the role public art plays in the selective consolidation of ...
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  • Maki, David Michael (1944–) 77% Maki, David Michael (1944-) - Born at Whitewood, Saskatchewan, on August 16, 1944, David Maki attended elementary school in a one-room log building. He played a key role in stopping the Devine government's plans to privatize Saskatchewan Government Insurance , and was on the interim planning group of the Saskatchewan Coalition for Social Justice which organized two of the largest demonstrations in Saskatchewan history, on April 18, 1987 and June 5, 1989, against the Devine government's cut ...
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  • Kalium Chemicals 77% Kalium Chemicals - Kalium Chemicals first began production and sale of potash in Saskatchewan in 1964 at Belle Plaine, west of Regina. Still in operation today, the Belle Plaine mine is considered the world’s lowest-cost potash mine, producing high-purity white potash for use in industrial products such as water softeners, alkaline batteries, and food sweeteners and additives. Production at Kalium Chemicals’ solution mine in Belle Plaine and at Noranda Mines’ potash ...
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  • Hospitals 77% In 1906, hospitals opened in Moose Jaw, Lloydminster and Wakaw, followed in 1907 by the Grey Nuns hospital in Regina and the Lady Minto hospital in Melfort, in 1909 by Saskatoon City Hospital, in 1910 by Holy Family Hospital in Prince Albert, in 1911 by Notre Dame Hospital in North Battleford, and in 1912 by Swift Current, Weyburn, St Elizabeth's in Humboldt, and Providence Hospital in Moose Jaw. In Saskatoon in March 2003, 638 acute care beds were divided as follows: Royal University ...
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  • Catholic Health Care 77% Catholic Health Care - In Saskatchewan, Catholic health care began when communities of religious women arrived in the region (North-West Territories). Between 1907 and 1952, religious congregations established hospitals in many communities which otherwise would have been without such services, namely St. Paul's, Saskatoon*; Grey Nuns', Regina; Holy Family, Prince Albert; Notre Dame, North Battleford; St. Elizabeth's, Humboldt*; Providence, Moose Jaw; Gabriel, Ponteix; St. Joseph's, Macklin; ...
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This web site was produced with financial assistance
provided by Western Economic Diversification Canada and the Government of Saskatchewan.
University of Regina Government of Canada Government of Saskatchewan Canadian Plains Research Center
Ce site Web a été conçu grâce à l'aide financière de
Diversification de l'économie de l'Ouest Canada et le gouvernement de la Saskatchewan.